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Saturday, 7 February 2015

Flight Attendant

The first flight attendant was actually a man. A German named Mr. Heinrich Kubis was the world’s first flight attendant in 1912.

The first female flight attendant was a registered nurse named Ellen Church. Miss Church approached officials of Boeing Air Transport and proposed that stewardesses be added to flight crews. Her idea was accepted, and she was appointed head stewardess, in charge of several other nurses, known as ‘Sky Girls.’ On May 15, 1930, Miss Church embarked on a Boeing 80A for a 20-hour flight from Oakland/San Francisco to Chicago with 13 stops and 14 passengers.

Ellen Church

The first women flight attendants in 1930 were required to be no older than 25, weigh no more than 115 pounds, no taller than 5 foot 4 inches,  be nurses and unmarried.

Miss Daphne Kearley became the first British air hostess in 1936. Paid £3 a week, she worked on Air Dispatch’s luxury service between Croydon, England and Le Bourget in France. She received 299 proposals of marriage in her first ten months in the job.

By the 1960′s the rules had scarcely changed., a stewardess had to be at least 5-foot 2 inches, weigh less than 130 pounds, be single and childless and retire at the ripe old age of 32 years.

American female flight attendants in the US were required to be single (either unmarried or widowed) until the 1980s. They were fired if they decided to get married.

The world record for the highest fall without a parachute belongs to a Serbian flight attendant named Vesna Vulovic. On January 26, 1972, an explosion on JAT Flight 367 caused the plane to break apart. Vulović, 22 years old at the time fell 10,160 metres (33,333 ft) nestled between a catering trolley, a dead body and the tail section of the plane. The first thing she asked for after waking up from a coma was a cigarette.

“Stewardesses” is the longest word that can be typed with only the left hand.

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